How is Kambo Harvested?

 

How is Kambo Harvested?

The frogs can be found in the trees near the rainforest waterways known as Igarapés, where they gather to sing and announce the rain. The Indians go out at dawn and sing and imitate the frogs' song to locate them in the trees. The frogs are very docile and nonreactive when they are picked up, possibly because they have no predators. The frogs are then gently tied by each leg with Palha strips, similar to straw, into an X shape; some of the secretion is carefully scraped off and put on small pieces of bamboo to dry. After its release, the frog returns to its habitat unharmed. The Palha strips leave white rings around the frog’s legs that takes about 3 months to fade, which lets the Indians know not to harvest from any frog that still has the white ring on its legs. The Indians believe that harming the frog will anger the animal spirits bringing negative consequences, and so they use the utmost care and respect when handling the frogs. Kambo collected in this way is considered 100% ethically harvested. We use only the freshest Kambo from Peru that is harvested in this manner.

kambo frog on sticks with man behind.jpg